Home » Merseburg: Merseburg Incantations, Marca Geronis, Merseburg-Querfurt, Bishopric of Merseburg, Merseburg University of Applied Sciences by Books LLC
Merseburg: Merseburg Incantations, Marca Geronis, Merseburg-Querfurt, Bishopric of Merseburg, Merseburg University of Applied Sciences Books LLC

Merseburg: Merseburg Incantations, Marca Geronis, Merseburg-Querfurt, Bishopric of Merseburg, Merseburg University of Applied Sciences

Books LLC

Published May 31st 2010
ISBN : 9781157498230
Paperback
30 pages
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Chapters: Merseburg Incantations, Marca Geronis, Merseburg-Querfurt, Bishopric of Merseburg, Merseburg University of Applied Sciences. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 29. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership inMoreChapters: Merseburg Incantations, Marca Geronis, Merseburg-Querfurt, Bishopric of Merseburg, Merseburg University of Applied Sciences. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 29. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Merseburg Incantations (German: ) are two medieval magic spells, charms or incantations, written in Old High German. They are the only known examples of Germanic pagan belief preserved in this language. They were discovered in 1841 by Georg Waitz, who found them in a theological manuscript from Fulda, written in the 9th or 10th century, although there remains some speculation about the date of the charms themselves. The manuscript (Cod. 136 f. 85a) was stored in the library of the cathedral chapter of Merseburg, hence the name. Each charm is divided into two parts: a preamble telling the story of a mythological event- and the actual spell in the form of a magic analogy (just as it was before... so shall it also be now...). In their verse form, the spells are of a transitional type- the lines show not only alliteration but also the end-rhymes developed in the Christian verse of the 9th century. Among the preliterate early Germanic tribes, incantations had the function of rendering usable, through binding words, the magic powers which people wished to make serve them They have survived in large numbers, particularly from the area of the Germanic languages. However, they all date from the Middle Ages and therefore bear the stamp or show the influence of Christianity. What is unique about the Merseburg Incantations is that they still reflect very clearly their pre-Christian origin (from before the year 750). They were written down for an unknown reason in the 10th century by a literate cleric, possibly in the abbey of Fulda, on a blank page of a liturgical book, which later pas...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=275736